1967 Camaro Battery

1967-Camaro-Battery
DateJune 25, 2020
Don't let the absence of the vent window fool you, OPTIMA Brand Ambassador Mike DuSold's Camaro is definitely a 1967 model and perhaps the most well-known example in the world, after having won the OPTIMA Ultimate Street Car Invitational with it in 2018 and 2019. It's now moving on to a run at the Pike's Peak Hill Climb, but today it is helping us explain the multitude of battery sizing options available for '67 Camaro owners.

Camaro owners could choose from six different engine options, including two V8s during the Camaro's initial production year. Not all of those engines had the same starting requirements of a battery, so if your 1967 Camaro came with one of the six-cylinder engines, then a Group 35 OPTIMA battery is the one you're looking for. Those batteries come in both a REDTOP and YELLOWTOP versions, so which one is right for your car? If your Camaro remains relatively-stock as it came from the factory, then a REDTOP is a great option that will offer plenty of cranking power. If you've modified the vehicle significantly from an electrical standpoint (aftermarket stereo, car alarm, etc...) then we would recommend a YELLOWTOP that is designed and warrantied for both starting and deep-cycle use.

If your 1967 Camaro came with one of the bigger V8 engines, like the 350, then you'll have as many as seven different battery options to choose from, although the Group 35 batteries won't be among them. Any of our Group 34 or 34/78 batteries in a REDTOP or YELLOWTOP are options, as well as our Group 25 or 75/25 batteries in a REDTOP or YELLOWTOP. As with the Group 35 batteries, the choices between the REDTOP and YELLOWTOP remain the same in terms of appropriate applications. However, the Group 34 and 34/78 batteries are larger, heavier and have more cranking amps, reserve capacity, etc... than their 25 or 75/25 counterparts.

That means if you feel like you want the extra power, get the bigger Group 34 or 34/78 battery. However, if extra cranking power or reserve capacity isn't as big of a concern (and all these choices have plenty of both), then the Group 75/25 REDTOP or Group 25 REDTOP are the least-expensive choices in the bunch. The only difference is that the 75/25 battery offers side and top post terminals, while the Group 25 offers only top posts (same thing with the 34/78 vs the 34).

All of these batteries come with three-year, free-replacement warranties, but we'll extend that coverage by a full year, if you buy your battery and an OPTIMA Digital 1200 battery charger from us at the same time. We don't think you'll ever need to use the warranty, but we know maintaining proper voltage levels (at least 12.6V in our REDTOPs and at least 13.0V in our YELLOWTOPs) whenever possible will maximize battery performance and lifespan and OPTIMA Chargers & Maintainers do a great job of that.