1969 Chevrolet Corvette Battery

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Many consider the late-60s to be a golden age of sports cars and musclecars and Corvette fans would have to agree. With folks like Motion Performance turning out amazing Vettes like this 520-horsepower Mako Shark II, it's hard to disagree. Cars from the late-1960s also offered their owners a lot of flexibility when it came to battery fitments. In the case of the 1969 Corvette, Stingray (or Mako Shark II) owners five different OPTIMA batteries to choose from. So which one would work best? It depends on the application.

OPTIMA REDTOP batteries are well-suited for SLI (starting/lighting/ignition) applications and offer slightly more cranking amps and slightly less reserve capacity than their YELLOWTOP counterparts, which are designed & warrantied for both starting and deep-cycle applications. In the case of cars like the '69 Corvette, it's unlikely they will see much deep-cycle use, so a REDTOP is probably a safe option. All five batteries offer side terminal connections, although the Group 78 REDTOP offers only side terminals, while all the others offer both side and top terminals.

The OPTIMA batteries with 78 sizing (either the 78 or the 34/78 models) are slightly larger, heavier and more expensive than the 75/25 batteries, but they also offer more cranking amps and reserve capacity. They all come with three-year, free-replacement warranties, but if you buy one of those batteries from us and buy an OPTIMA Digital 1200 charger & maintainer at the same time, we'll add an additional year of warranty coverage to your battery.

Even if your '69 Corvette isn't a six-figure example like this Mako Shark II, which has a provenance that includes ownership by Reggie Fountain of Fountain Powerboats, you'll appreciate the peace of mind the sealed design offered by OPTIMA batteries, which minimizes the chance of corrosive battery acid damaging your Corvette.